Digital Cable Filter

THE TRUTH ABOUT DIGITAL CABLE FILTERS

and other devices that claim to descramble digital cable programming

Note: The following information is intended to help consumers avoid falling for the digital cable filter scam and other related scams and bad advice. I do not condone the theft of cable television services, and I recommend all readers of this report contact their local cable provider to inform them of any and all new equipment purchased to work with their digital cable television system.

Thank you for purchasing my report about digital cable filters and other descrambling devices. The following information will not only protect you from falling for the digital filter scam, it will also explain how some people attempt to get digital cable services free, and will reveal whether these methods are successful or not.

The topic of descrambling cable television has always been of interest to me. I guess it appeals to me because it’s akin to “cops and robbers.” The cable companies constantly make improvements to their security measures to make stealing cable television more difficult, and the hacker community is constantly trying to defeat these new measures. So who’s ahead now? Is it the cops, or is it the robbers?

Cable television has come a long way since those college days when everybody had analog cable systems and descrambling cable television was about the easiest thing in the world. But now, with the advent of digital cable, it’s become a lot more difficult to accomplish cable descrambling without paying. Digital cable boxes and the technology inside of them is very advanced!

This new digital technology has sent people who formerly descrambled analog cable television searching for new devices. And unfortunately, along with the advent of digital cable has come a whole host of “blackbox” scams created to separate you from your money. And what better place to start than the digital cable filter SCAM! This one is huge folks, and people are losing lots of money. Now pay close attention, because if you are thinking about buying one of these devices or have already bought one, I’m about to save you from making a huge mistake.

The Digital Cable Filter Scam Exposed

digital cable filter
“Digital Cable Filter”

You’ve by this time probably seen all the advertisements and web sites promoting an inexpensive “digital cable filter” that will supposedly prevent your cable box from sending billing information back to your cable provider. Could this little inexpensive device actually WORK? The answer is a resounding YES! Believe it or not, these little devices do precisely what they are advertised to do. Information sent from your cable provider to your box is sent on a HIGH frequency. Information from your cable box back to your cable provider is sent on a LOW frequency. These little digital cable filters block this lower frequency, preventing billing information from going back to your cable provider, while allowing all of the higher frequency signals to come into your cable box as usual.

ADS

The problem is with what these ads and web sites DO NOT tell you. It’s the hidden secret behind all of these devices that these vendors do not want you to know. While the digital cable filter device does in fact prevent billing information from being sent back to your cable provider, all of your pay per view programming that you have ordered in the past remains stored in the memory of your cable box. Eventually, once you have ordered too many pay per view events and your box has not been able to “purge” these events because it cannot successfully communicate with your cable provider, it will no longer let you order any additional pay per view programming. Here is a quote from one user who tried it:

“Mine also locked up after 10 uses – they [the cable company] came out to my complex 3 times and claimed there was a problem outside somewhere. I disconnected the box all together prior to their visit. Anyway they replaced my box Comcast Motorola and they fixed my old box. I got billed for $260.00 in PPV charges; I had WWE & boxing events and also the $3.99 movies. The moral of this story is these cheap piece of sh*t filters are going to burn a lot of people — it ain’t worth the headaches it will give you latter.”

But that’s not even the worst part. Even if the reset instructions for your box do happen to work, you’re still in trouble anyway. Every so often your cable company sends out a test signal to ensure your cable box is “on line” (e.g. on the cable network). Because your digital cable filter prevents your box from sending information BACK to your cable company, your box will no longer be able to report back to your cable provider that it is online. When this happens several times in a row, eventually your cable company will shut off ALL of your digital cable television programming. Never mind watching free pay per view programming any longer. You will now have no cable television services whatsoever! And good luck trying to explain to your cable company what happened when you need your service restored. When you try to get your service back, you’ll have to disconnect your digital cable filter, and eventually the cable company will see all of the pay per view programming you have ordered in the past and you will receive a HUGE bill for everything you have watched. Unless you choose to DESTROY your cable box instead. If you destroy your box, where will you tell your cable company it went??? Wonder why the “digital cable filter” sellers only offer a 30-day guarantee? This is precisely why. For the first 30 days you will likely be satisfied. But after your 30-day warranty period has passed and you lose 100% of your digital cable television programming, GOOD LUCK trying to get your money back from the scam artist who sold you your digital cable filter!

Your only sure fire solution is to burn your house down.

Here is an actual quote from somebody who used a digital cable filter:

“WARNING….I am one of the few who actually got instructions with my digital cable filter purchase that really reset my digital cable box PPV settings back to 0′s. After reading up on it and then experimenting on my own this is what I found: Even though your settings say 0, the information that you watched these PPV events is still there. This box is a computer. The information is not deleted, just moved to a temp folder as it were. 1. As long as the filter is on, the Cable Co. cannot communicate with your box. 2. When the Cable Co. cannot communicate with your box, they turn off your PPV feature, or even worse your cable all together. 3. Every PPV event that you “purchase” is date and time stamped. 4. You have to eventually turn in your box back to the Cable Co. 5. It is punishable by law to alter your cable box and “steal cable” VIA hefty fine and possible jail time. 6. When you remove your filter and re-hook your cable to the box, even though your settings say 0, you will let your Cable Co. again communicate with your box (computer) and give them the information of each and every PPV event ever watched through your box. (Your wife will see all the porn on your next bill!) 7. The more months that go by without being charged for your PPV, the harder it is to explain away. Is it worth the hassle anyway?”


Where to buy other digital cable filters if you want one anyway

Here’s another scam for you: Have you seen the 85 MHZ “digital cable filters” being advertised? Don’t believe the hype. These digital cable filters actually provide poorer performance than the 45 MHz filters. So why are people selling them? Well, it’s simple: It’s a very polite and smart way of scamming you out of more money. I know what a 85MHZ digital cable filter is and all they do is eliminate an option you have with the 45MHZ filter. Some boxes work on different frequencies and sometimes go as low as 45MHz. Now when that happens and you have an 85-1000 MHz filter installed, nothing will be blocked and the filter will be useless to you. If you actually wanted to use a digital cable filter, the best bet is to always give yourself a wider range. With the 45MHZ-1000MHZ filter you are protected from anything between these 2 #’s. Same goes for the higher MHz filters — you are only protected between those 2 #’s but not lower then that. This is why I say: Bigger is NOT always better! So there you have it. The regular 45 MHz cable filters are bad enough, and the 85 MHz filters are even worse. And BOTH will eventually cause your cable television services to be shut off. Need I say more?

Here’s another surprising tip: Many VCRs will also block the lower frequency sent back to your cable television provider. Normally you hook up the cable coming into your home into your digital cable box, and then into your VCR, and then into your television. But instead, if you hook up the incoming cable to your VCR, then to your digital cable box, and then to your television, your VCR itself will likely prevent your Pay Per View programming from being billed. A good way to test this is to simply hook up your VCR in this fashion for one month and order a Pay per View event or two. Most likely you will not be billed. But again, your cable box will still “hold on to” all Pay Per View programming you have ordered, and you will eventually not be able to order any more. Hooking up your VCR in this fashion will also stop your digital cable box from communicating with your cable provider, thus your television services will eventually be cut off by your cable provider. Note: In addition to not recommending you hook up your VCR in this fashion, if you do, your VCR will also not function correctly with your digital cable television services (e.g. you cannot play recorded programs from your VCR through your digital cable box). It would simply be a barrier created to prevent your cable provider from billing you for Pay Per View television services. However, if you do this, it is a handy way of having no blatantly illegal equipment hooked up to your television. Even if the cable company knocked on your door, you could easily chalk this situation up to a mistake. Just remember, doing this will most likely result in eventually being hit with a big bill.